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Posts Tagged: Health & Wellness

September is National Family Meals Month™ >

On 09.16.2016 by Molly Bray Yunek

This September we are celebrating National Family Meals Month™. Family life can be hectic and getting everyone to sit down around the table to enjoy a meal together might not always be an option. But research has shown that just a few meals per week shared between parents and their children can have several health benefits. Kids and teens who share meals with their families three or more times per week are less likely to be overweight, more likely to eat healthier foods, and show more respect for their families. Quick and easy meal ideas We understand time can be limited during the week. Here are a few quick and easy skillet meals that everyone in the family will love. Each is ready in less Read More >

Pregnant? Follow these Food-Safe Tips >

On 09.01.2016 by Sue Grossbauer, RD

Pregnancy is a time when you are keenly aware of caring for your health. And during this special time, food safety is particularly important, because your immune system may not be as strong as usual. Both mom and baby are at heightened susceptibility to foodborne illness. Pregnant moms at risk In fact, 1 in 7 people who contracts the foodborne illness called Listeriosis (caused by Listeria monocytogenes bacteria) is a pregnant woman, according to the CDC. This serious illness can result in miscarriage. Unpasteurized milk and soft cheese made from unpasteurized milk are major sources. Lunch meats, hot dogs, and smoked seafood can also be sources. Listeria grows even under refrigeration, so even processed meats, if contaminated, can be a problem if stored too long. Read More >

Healthy Post-Workout Snacking >

On 08.18.2016 by Molly Bray Yunek

Breakfast is typically touted as the most important meal of the day. We have heard time and time again about the importance of refueling within the first few hours of waking after a night’s rest, as we are essentially fasting while we sleep. However, we might not be considering the other time of day when replenishing and refueling our bodies is in similar demand—post-workout. For those of us able to be physically active a few days a week, it is vitally important to nourish our bodies after breaking a sweat. Replenish your body’s stores After an hour or so of moderate-to-intense physical activity, our bodies have tapped into our carbohydrate stores (glycogen, specifically), broken down muscle, and depleted our fluids and electrolytes to fuel the Read More >

Stay Fuller Longer with Eggs and Other Satiety-Boosting Foods >

On 04.20.2016 by Molly Bray Yunek

The primary purpose of food is to satisfy hunger, provide energy, and supply our bodies with essential nutrients. Although we also choose what we eat based on taste and personal preferences, it is important to have a strong foundation of satiety-boosting and nutrient packed foods in our daily diets. What is a satiety-boosting food? Satiety-boosting foods are ones that are rich in fiber, healthy fats, and protein. They are digested slower, thus keeping us fuller for longer. On the other hand, foods high in refined carbohydrates, such as white bread and sugar-sweetened beverages, offer very little satiety and often lead to overeating. To build your foundation of satiety-boosting foods, check out these super-filling options. Pulses, avocados, and nuts increase satiety Pulses—also known as beans—are a Read More >

Tips for Healthy Snacking >

On 03.24.2016 by Molly Bray Yunek

Snacking can be the key to a healthy diet when done properly. But according to the USDA, the average snack for U.S. adults tends to have higher proportions of carbs and total sugars than beneficial nutrients such as protein and fiber. What to look for in a healthy snack The best snacks are those that fill you up quickly, keep you feeling full until mealtime, and add relatively few calories to your daily total. When picking a snack, aim for something that follows these simple criteria: Few calories. Most fruits and vegetables are low in calories. Even when you eat a portion that satisfies your hunger, the calorie count is low. High in protein. Quality protein can increase satiety, help manage weight, and prevent chronic Read More >

Light & Healthy Baked Huevos Rancheros–A Healthy Breakfast! >

On 03.08.2016 by Chantel Arsenault

Looking to jumpstart healthy eating? Why not start your day with light and healthy baked huevos rancheros—MyPlate style? The USDA resource called MyPlate tells us that everything we eat matters. The secret to good healthy eating? “Focus on variety, amount, and nutrition,” advises the USDA. Eggs in the MyPlate resource The MyPlate resource shows us that fruits and vegetables should fill up half the plate. One-quarter of the plate should be protein, such as eggs. The other quarter of the plate should be grains, especially whole grains. The dairy food group sits on the side and can feature foods such as milk, soy milk, yogurt, or cheese. Take a look at how the light & healthy baked huevos rancheros recipe fits into MyPlate: Easy, delicious, Read More >

National Nutrition Month® – Making the Most of Breakfast >

On 03.03.2016 by Molly Bray Yunek

March is National Nutrition Month®, which makes this a perfect time to review some of the best recommendations for achieving a healthy diet. There is a lot of confusing and conflicting information when it comes to improving our eating habits. With new diet trends that focus on a “free-from” platform, it may seem that eating healthy is becoming increasingly complicated. We are being told to select foods that are free-from gluten and free-from dairy. There are dozens of other elements misleadingly being labeled as dangerous for our health. U.S. adults not getting enough fruits and veggies Let us take this opportunity during National Nutrition Month® to step back and practice the fundamentals of healthy eating. Before we remove anything from our diet, let’s start with Read More >

Dietary Cholesterol: the Good vs. the Myth >

On 02.24.2016 by Chantel Arsenault

For many years, dietary cholesterol has been getting a bad rap. Previously blamed as a main factor in increasing LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol in the body, US Dietary Guidelines as recently as 2010 encouraged individuals to avoid foods high in cholesterol, such as egg yolks, butter, meats, etc. However, today, the 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recognize that dietary cholesterol does not have the impact on blood cholesterol that was previously believed. What is cholesterol? Cholesterol is a fat-like substance that aids in digestion, hormone production, and vitamin D production. Your body produces some cholesterol on its own, but it can also be found in foods originating from animals, e.g., meat, dairy, and eggs. With cholesterol, you aren’t what you eat As information about nutrition Read More >

2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans Recommend Pasteurized Eggs >

On 01.15.2016 by Sue Grossbauer, RD

How do you promote personal health and reduce your risk of chronic illnesses? One answer is to follow the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion’s 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The Guidelines present advice for nutrition, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and food safety—as defined by current science. Raw eggs? Use pasteurized eggs As for food safety, the updated Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend using pasteurized eggs for any recipe that calls for raw eggs, saying, “Always use pasteurized eggs or egg products when preparing foods that are made with raw eggs (e.g., eggnog, smoothies and other drinks, hollandaise sauce, ice cream, and uncooked cookie dough).” Many people don’t know this, but most eggs in cartons are not pasteurized. Davidson’s Safest Choice™ Pasteurized Eggs eliminate Read More >

Breakfast and Blood Glucose Control >

On 12.11.2015 by Molly Bray Yunek

If you are one of the 30 million Americans who skip breakfast you may be putting yourself at risk for developing type 2 diabetes.  Eating the most important meal of the day may be one of the most important things you can do to protect yourself from developing a disease that is expected to affect nearly 40% of Americans during their lifetimes. Several studies suggest that a daily breakfast can significantly decrease your risk of type 2 diabetes and improve overall blood sugar control for individuals with the disease. Skipping breakfast leads to higher blood sugar One study published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition followed more than 29,000 men to examine patterns between eating habits and type 2 diabetes. Over the 16-year study, Read More >