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Huevos Divorciados (Divorced Eggs) Recipe

The Huevos Divorciados is an authentic Mexican egg dish featuring two eggs sunny side up with “each egg going its separate way,”  served under two different sauces (Salsa Verde and Salsa Roja) nestled on two separate, crispy, corn tortillas. The dish is usually accompanied by friendly guacamole and a side dish such as spicy Mexican breakfast potatoes. Recipe created by Chef Jeffrey Clark.

Servings: 2

Active time: I hour 55 minutes or 30 minutes for easier version

Total time:

Huevos Divorciados (Divorced Eggs)

Ingredients

  • 4 (6-inch) corn or flour tortillas
  • olive oil
  • 2 Tbsp butter
  • 4 Davidson's Safest Choice® pasteurized egg(s)
  • 12 Tbsp Roasted Fresh Tomato Salsa heated, divided usage
  • 12 Tbsp Roasted Tomatillo Salsa, heated, divided usage
  • 1/4 c crumbled queso fresco or shredded Monterey Jack cheese
  • 1/4 c minced fresh cilantro
  • 4 thin slices red onion, separated
  • 2 lime wedges
  • 4 Tbsp prepared guacamole
  • breakfast potatoes (optional)
  • refried beans or black beans (optional)

Preparation

Huevos Divorciados (Divorced Eggs)

  1. Brush both sides of tortillas with olive oil. Place on baking pan; bake at 400°F 6 minutes or until crisp.
  2. Meanwhile, prepare sunny side up eggs. Heat 1 tablespoon butter in large nonstick skillet over medium-low heat until melted. Gently slide 2 eggs into skillet. Cook 1 to 2 minutes or until whites are set and opaque and yolks begin to firm. Gently remove from skillet; repeat with remaining butter and eggs.
  3. Place two tortillas side by side on dinner plates. Place one egg on each tortilla. On each plate, ladle 6 tablespoons of the red salsa around one egg and 6 tablespoons of the salsa verde around the second egg. Sprinkle eggs with equal amounts cheese and cilantro. Garnish with onion slices, lime wedge and guacamole. Serve with breakfast potatoes, refried beans, or black beans, if desired.

Notes

Recipe can be doubled or tripled.

Roasted Fresh Tomato Salsa (6 servings)

  • 1 lb medium fresh Roma tomatoes
  • 4 slices yellow onion (1/4-inch thick slices)
  • 8 cloves garlic, peeled
  • 3 Tbsp minced fresh cilantro
  • 2 Tbsp chipotle peppers in adobo sauce (with some of the sauce from the can)
  • 1 tsp fine sea salt
  • 1 tsp ground cumin
  • 1/2 tsp black pepper
  • 3 Tbsp olive oil

Roasted Fresh Tomato Salsa (6 servings)

  1. Preheat oven broiler to high.
  2. Cut Roma tomatoes lengthwise in half; place cut-side-down on lightly oiled baking pan. Place onion slices next to tomatoes.
  3. Place pan about 2 inches from broiler. Broil 5 minutes. Turn tomatoes and onion. Add garlic cloves to pan. Return pan to broiler; broil 5 minutes. Remove garlic; set aside. Turn tomatoes and onion; continue broiling about 3 minutes or until vegetables begin to brown.
  4. Place roasted tomatoes, onion and garlic in bowl of food processor. Add remaining ingredients except oil. Process 30 seconds or until coarsely chopped.
  5. Heat 3 tablespoons olive oil in large nonstick skillet over medium heat until hot. Add contents of food processor to skillet. Cook 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Reduce heat; simmer 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until thickened as desired.
  6. Cool sauce. Place in food-safe container; cover and refrigerate.

Notes

It is best to make this salsa one day in advance to allow flavors to develop. If a spicier, more authentic version is desired add 1 or 2 additional tablespoons of chipotle in adobo sauce and double the cilantro in the recipe. Roma tomatoes are preferred in this recipe as they are drier and firmer than traditional tomatoes. Using Roma tomatoes results in a thicker, less liquid salsa when refrigerated.

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa (6 servings)

  • 1 lb fresh tomatillos
  • 1 large fresh poblano chile or 3 medium Anaheim chiles
  • 1 Tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 c diced yellow onion (about 1/4-inch dice)
  • 1 medium fresh jalapeño chile, stem removed, diced (1/4-inch dice)
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 3 Tbsp minced fresh cilantro
  • 1 tsp dried Mexican oregano
  • Fine sea salt to taste

Roasted Tomatillo Salsa (6 servings)

  1. Preheat oven broiler to high.
  2. Remove paper thin husks from tomatillos; remove stems and rinse well with warm water. Cut tomatillos in half; place on lightly oiled baking pan. Place poblano chile next to tomatillos.
  3. Place pan about 2 inches from broiler. Broil 5 minutes. Remove tomatillos. Continue broiling chile, turning frequently until skin is blackened on both sides. Remove chile from pan; wrap in damp towel. When cool, peel away charred skin; remove stems and seeds.
  4. Heat 1 tablespoon olive oil in medium nonstick skillet over low heat until hot. Add onion, jalapeño and garlic. Cook about 5 minutes or until onion softens, stirring frequently to blend ingredients and prevent scorching.
  5. Place onion mixture in bowl of food processor. Add roasted tomatillos, chile and remaining ingredients. Process 15 seconds or until coarsely chopped and blended.
  6. Cool sauce. Place in food-safe container; cover and refrigerate.

Notes

It is best to make this salsa one day in advance to allow flavors to develop. If a spicier version is desired substitute 2 serrano chiles for jalapeño.

Guacamole de la Casa (6 servings)

  • 2 large semi-firm avocados
  • 1/4 c diced fresh tomatoes (1/4-inch dice)
  • 1/4 c diced red onion (1/4-inch dice)
  • 1/4 c minced fresh cilantro
  • fine sea salt to taste
  • 2 Tbsp fresh lime juice or to taste

Guacamole de la Casa

  1. Cut avocados in half lengthwise; remove seeds. Using large spoon or serving spoon, scoop out pulp and place in large bowl.
  2. Add remaining ingredients except lime juice; mash together with back of fork. (Do not mash smooth; small pieces of avocado should remain.)
  3. Place guacamole in food-safe container. Spritz lime juice over surface of guacamole. Cover bowl with plastic wrap and refrigerate up to 2 hours prior to serving.

Notes

The chances of finding the perfect avocados the day before needed is highly unlikely. Buy firm avocados two or three days ahead of preparation and allow them to ripen in a paper bag. When ready to use they will still be semi-firm to the touch, but slightly soft. For best results, prepare guacamole at least one hour before serving.

Variations

For a shortcut, use store-bought red salsa, store-bought salsa verde, and store-bought guacamole in place of the Roasted Fresh Tomato Salsa, Roasted Tomatillo Salsa, and Guacamole de la Casa.

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Nutrition Facts

Serving Size (1/2 of recipe)
Total Servings 2

Amount Per Serving:

Nutrition Category Amount
Calories 580
Total Fat 36g (55% DV)
Saturated Fat 14g (70% DV)
Cholesterol 471mg (157% DV)
Sodium 1881mg (78% DV)
Total
Carbohydrate
44g (15% DV)
Protein 20g

Percent Daily Values (DV) are based on a 2,000 calorie diet.

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Pasteurized equals peace of mind

Davidson's Safest Choice® pasteurized eggs taste great and are safe for all your favorite egg dishes! Davidson's gentle water bath pasteurization reduces the risk of Salmonella in eggs without changing the nutrition or flavor. In fact, Davidson's pasteurized eggs have earned the Seal of Approval for exceptional flavor and culinary performance from the American Culinary Federation (ACF).

The Raw Egg Risk

Davidson's eggs aren't just good for sunny-side up or poached eggs. Consider all the recipes that feature raw eggs, like eggnog, Caesar salad dressing, raw cookie dough, custard and more. Take homemade ice cream, for example. Over a four-year period, more than 500 illnesses in the US were traced to Salmonella bacteria in homemade ice cream, according to the CDC. The ingredient at fault? Raw or undercooked eggs.